10 survival hacks that will come to your rescue more than once

It is this technique that professionals such as Mark Jenkins use when they get lost in the desert without a GPS or phone. It means “stop, think, observe, and plan.” Protecting yourself from injuries, finding clean water and the path to civilization may take longer than you expected.

That’s why today at  Mood for you.com, we  offer you some practical tips that can come in handy if you are left alone with the wild.

1. Put a plastic bag on the branch to collect water

plastic bag on the branch to collect water

Finding a source of fresh water is a priority for those lost in the wild. The time that a person can survive without water depends on the conditions. For reference: an athlete training hard in hot weather can get dehydrated, overheat and die in a matter of hours.

Fortunately, using condensate to get fresh water is pretty simple. Wrap a plastic bag around a branch with leaves in the sun and get an unlimited supply of fresh water.

2. Wrap the body with bubble wrap and / or leaves to keep warm

2. Wrap the body with bubble wrap and / or leaves to keep warm

This may seem like impractical advice, but packaging the bubble wrap is extremely important when camping in cold weather. This package holds the air layer as a buffer and acts as an excellent heat insulator. It is also used to warm windows in winter. If the film is not at hand, you can always use dry leaves. Studies have shown that, for example, dry leaves of apple trees improve thermal insulation.

3. Collect morning dew with bracelets on your feet

3. Collect morning dew with bracelets on your feet

This method was widely used by Australian Aborigines who traveled long distances without water. They rolled dry grass into a  ball or wrapped it around their ankles during movement until sunrise, collecting water from the dew.

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4. Sleep on a raised platform to avoid hypothermia

4. Sleep on a raised platform to avoid hypothermia

Keeping going at night is not the most sensible thing to do. If you have to spend the night in the wild, you have to find a suitable shelter. If there are no caves nearby or another way to defend yourself, you need to isolate yourself from the cold and sleep on an elevation to avoid hypothermia.

5. Rub your hands with pine needles so that mosquitoes bite less

5. Rub your hands with pine needles so that mosquitoes bite less

You can use natural remedies to avoid these potentially dangerous insects. For example, the smell of pine oil repels mosquitoes and some types of ticks.

6. Pretend to be dead when faced with large animals

6. Pretend to be dead when faced with large animals

When meeting a bear, it is best to slowly back back, since in most cases the bear is more afraid of you than you are. True, during a black bear attack, fighting back might be a good idea. However, if you met someone larger and more powerful, such as a grizzly, the best chance of survival is to curl up and pretend to be dead.

7. Cross the river where the water is deep and slow

7. Cross the river where the water is deep and slow

Crossing may seem like a simple matter, but you need to be careful with it. The safest places to cross are straight sections between river bends. The faster the current, the more dangerous it is. Throw a stick to check the speed of the current. Remember that it is easier to cross deep and slow water than fast and shallow.

When crossing a river, always go upstream , so that the water flows towards you, and lean forward slightly, keeping your feet shoulder-width apart. Bend your knees to lower the center of gravity, and take the stick as the third fulcrum: it’s safer to cross over alone.

8. Make ice in the shape of a lens to light a fire

8. Make ice in the shape of a lens to light a fire

A transparent ice floe with a thickness of about 5 cm can be turned into a lens for lighting a fire according to the same principle as with a magnifying glass. The trick is to create a shape that is thin at the edges and thick in the middle. Smooth the surface with your hands to adjust the effectiveness of the ice lens.

9. Collect wet leaves to burn them and give smoke signals

9. Collect wet leaves to burn them and give smoke signals

When you solve the issue of water, shelter and fire, your priority should be to reduce the time spent in the wild. A smoke alarm can save your life. Abundant smoke can be obtained using wet leaves.

Then use a wet blanket or large leaves to divide the column of smoke into 3 clouds. If someone on a plane or boat sees your smoke alarm, they will not confuse him with a forest fire. A pillar of smoke with 3 clouds is an emergency code for Native Americans and Boy Scouts.

10. Use ashes as a disinfectant

10. Use ashes as a disinfectant

In such a situation, hygiene may seem the least of your worries. However, you may need to wash your hands to give yourself first aid. In this case, you can use the ash from the fire, because, according to this study , it is as effective as soap.

Bonus: Ignore survival myths such as drinking urine or moss growing only on the north side

Ignore survival myths such as drinking urine or moss growing only on the north side

Drinking urine or using moss as a guideline are some of the myths that came to us from the movies. Unfortunately, both of them are incorrect. First, urine can be more or less sterile only if you have healthy kidneys. Secondly, the whole point of urinating is that your body filters out excess salts and minerals from the blood. Its repeated consumption will put a serious strain on the kidneys and will only aggravate your thirst due to the sodium content.

Moss, on the other hand, grows wherever there is little moisture and little sun. In some places in the Northern Hemisphere, it does grow on the northern side, but this is not an absolute rule . In the southern hemisphere, moss can also grow on the southern side of trees.

Tips may depend on the climate of your area. Do you have your own survival techniques? What other survival myths should be debunked?

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